TFDI Music Festival – Tickets – Evanston SPACE – Evanston, IL – September 7th, 2018

TFDI Music Festival

Buncearoo Presents

TFDI Music Festival

Keaton Simons

Fri, September 7, 2018 - Sat, September 8, 2018

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

Evanston SPACE

Evanston, IL

$159

This event is all ages

TFDI
TFDI
It all started early fall 2009, Tony Lucca & Jay Nash co-headlined a tour which featured Matt Duke as support. The bromance was set into motion. Early in the tour, the three recognized that they had great musical chemistry with their three part harmony and different, yet complementary approaches to guitar.
On a day off, 09/09/09, to be exact Lucca, Nash and Duke recorded four songs in an impromptu session at SPACE in Evanston, IL. Upon hearing those recordings, management and Rykodisc almost immediately put a plan together to release them as a four song EP. Two months later, the TFDI EP was released and quickly rose to number 1 on the iTunes Singer/Songwriter chart and stayed there for weeks. That EP has sold nearly 30,000 digital copies to date. Tony Lucca, Jay Nash and Matt Duke joined forces again in 2010 for a national tour that was largely sold out, and wrote and recorded the TFDI full length When I Stop Running.
That tour schedule was cut short by Tony Lucca's success on The Voice. In 2016, TFDI played together again for the first time in five years and decided that they needed to record more music together. Beggars & Ballers is TFDI's first release in nearly six years.
A Note From TFDI:
We find ourselves in a precarious moment for our country and our place in history. There is a lot of noise, plenty of division and truth often gets lost in the chaos.
As songwriters and individuals, just as with politics and social progress, lone voices are often drowned out by the fray. We don't think that it is a coincidence that time and fate brought TFDI back together after a five year hiatus, at this particular time and place. As much as each of us enjoy the freedom and catharsis of our individual musical endeavors, there is something undeniably powerful and resonant that happens when we pool our efforts, energy and talent. We uncover something more...something bigger than ourselves.
When we got together in December, we all found ourselves individually reflecting on this dismal, downward spiral that was the 2016 election cycle. No matter what side you were on, it was not a pretty thing to behold.
Each of us sought that catharsis that can only be found in music. Our musical reflections on the times each had their own respective personalities. Songs like Anymore and Make Sense of it All don't require much of a magnifying glass to see how they relate to the news cycle, while Moving On, Surrender and Maybe I Should Go use the metaphor of a hobbled relationships to parallel political dysfunction and potential resolution.
We chose to cover Bob Dylan's 'My Back Pages', not only because it is such an incredible and timeless piece of music and poetry, but because it feels so perfectly relevant to the 'here and now' to each of us. That song just covers so much ground.
At the end of the day, we cannot help but recognize that we get so much further in this world, when we seek harmony. While don't care what side you're on, but we hope these songs help you find the truth.
Meiko
Meiko
It’s been a busy two years for acclaimed singer-songwriter Meiko – after months on the road touring in support of 2014’s Dear You LP, she got married in the summer of 2015, and recorded and independently released her Live Songs From The Hotel Café EP which served as the timestamp for a personal Los Angeles sendoff. Meiko moved from the City of Angels to Music City this past fall, and in-between the tour dates, nuptials, a honeymoon, and packing for the one-way trek to Nashville, she wrote a new, career-defining album, appropriately titled Moving Day.

“Every song on the album is about moving in some way, shape, or form”, Meiko says. “Whether it’s moving to a new place, moving into different relationships, or just growing up and moving on emotionally, I love the idea of constant growth and change. This album represents some key moments of personal ‘moving days’ I’ve had in my life over the past 10 years.”
Emerson Hart
Emerson Hart
Emerson Hart, frontman for the multi-platinum band Tonic, comes back to time and again on his new record, his first solo release in over six years. Beauty in Disrepair, due out in early 2014, touches on loss, but also the beauty of rebirth, newfound love, family and starting a clean slate. Beauty in Disrepair marks a remarkably polished and honest follow-up to his 2007 solo debut Cigarettes & Gasoline, a critically-acclaimed album that spawned two Top 20 singles.
Gabe Dixon
Gabe Dixon
Over the past few years, Gabe Dixon changed almost everything. The Nashville-based troubadour focused on starting from scratch following the release of 2011’s One Spark. He parted ways with his longtime management and record label Concord Music Group, and he began feverishly penning ideas. However, the one thing that didn’t change was that honest, heartfelt approach to songwriting that countless fans fell in love with when he first emerged in 1999.
“I started writing a lot more than ever before,” he recalls. “I had so many songs, and I was really thinking about some weighty subjects—mortality, what’s important in life, and the value of love. In many ways, the music was about learning how to be in a committed relationship, leave immature ways behind, grow, evolve, and move on from habits that aren’t necessarily who you are anymore.”
With a clean slate and the biggest batch of songs yet, he entered The Smoakstack recording studio in Berry Hill, TN with producer Paul Moak [Mat Kearney, Third Day] in early 2015. He wanted to embrace what came most naturally and build a raw and real body of work.
“I wasn’t interested in making an album with any sequencing or anything on-the-grid,” he affirms. “I wasn’t interested in just handing over my songs to somebody. I wanted to go in with musicians and get performances that were inspiring and inspired and take it from there. Paul was completely on the same page. What results is an album that feels very natural and almost folk-y at times. I went a little off course on One Spark; I didn’t trust myself. I learned to trust myself, and the sound of Turns To Gold is the most representative of who I am. It’s warm, laidback, acoustic, and live.”
In the past, Gabe would play primarily grand piano. However, on Turns To Gold, he performed all but one song on an upright piano. This choice conveyed a different energy. He and the musicians cut everything to analog tape with no click track. In keeping with his newfound independence, he also launched a PledgeMusic campaign—another first—the day he began recording. Exceeding the goal within less than two months, he offered fans a distinct vignette into the creative process.
“I love this way of doing things because it puts me in the driver’s seat creatively, and I can retain more ownership of the project,” he says. “I could do whatever I wanted, and that was inspiring. It also encouraged me to connect with the fans even more. That was incredible.”
The album opener and first single “Holding Her Freedom” coasts between a shimmering piano melody, organ swell, guitar rumble, and heavenly vocal performance from Gabe. It also conveys a cinematic narrative.
“It’s a story about a woman who has been burned by love, and she’s afraid to let herself be vulnerable and fall in love again,” he explains. “She’s figuratively holding her freedom like a cage. That same ‘freedom’ keeps her trapped and unable to love again. I was glad to write a song with a little story to follow.”
Elsewhere, “That Redemption” begins with a bombastic groove that slides towards a spirited refrain bolstered by bluesy guitars and handclaps. “It’s about someone flying too close to the sun in a mythical sense,” he continues. “Their values are in the wrong place. They’re not treating people the way they should be treated. It can’t go on forever, and they’re going to get knocked down.”
“The One Thing I Did Right” pairs a soft piano melody with one of his most soulful performances on the album for an undeniable ballad. “It’s about my wife and remembering what’s most important in my life,” he says. “It’s a tribute to her. She’s a constant in a world that seems to be always changing around me.”
“I hope when people listen to the album, it makes them feel,” he leaves off. “Music has moved me so much. I want to do the same thing for others.”
Whiskey Wolves of the West
Whiskey Wolves of the West
Brainchild of veteran singer songwriters, Leroy Powell and Tim Jones, The Whiskey Wolves of The West are delivering a raw, authentic sound...something that can only be earned by a thousand nights in smokey bars and a million miles on bald bus tires.
Studio musician/producer extraordinaire, Leroy Powell, is heard on so many of your favorite records. Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings, Waylon Jennings, Whiskey Myers and countless tracks with Grammy Awards Producer Dave Cobb. Vocal powerhouse, Tim Jones, shines on his notable collaborations with Chris Robinson (The Black Crowes), Carl Broemel (My Morning Jacket), and Truth & Salvage
The Contenders
The Contenders
The legend Levon Helm said that if you give it good concentration, good energy, good heart, and good performance, the song will play you. If that’s true, then Jay Nash and Josh Day are well and truly played by the set of songs in their debut EP, “Meet The Contenders.” The collection breathes with musicality and grit in the tradition of heroes—The Band, Tom Petty, The Dead, Dylan. Thrumming and heady, with a steady heartbeat and a hint of honky-tonk, this EP speaks of wanderers and highways, lovers and losers, good times and missed chances,swimming pools and movie stars, all with a ferocity born of hard work and honed skill. Nash and Day have been players and poets for the better part of two decades; they have been making music, telling tales, drinking whiskey,and having fun touring together as The Contenders since 2012.

Jay Nash’s music is like the river that raised him—strong and deep, with a little bit of lullaby and a big damn current. Twenty years ago, he played loud in bars along the Saint Lawrence River, in the reaches of New York so far-flung they’re almost Canadian. For the last decade, he’s journeyed the US and Europe solo, selling over 60,000 records without ever putting ink on a conventional record deal. Now in the green mountains, the quiet cold of winter rarefies wit and musicianship into the kind of Americana that knows where it comes from.

Hailing from the sweet, sticky hill country of North Carolina, Josh Day brings a percussive virtuosity that shapes the music and supports the vocals. With shining creativity and fine-boned craftsmanship, Day has that special something that resonates with audiences and always feels like a party. Be it playing bluegrass with the Kruger Brothers, touring with Sara Bareilles, or drumming for Jennifer Nettles, Day keeps it busy and honest, just whatone would expect from a man who plays with so much heart.

Lady luck introduced Nash and Day at Room 5 in Los Angeles over a decade ago. They both loved The Band and whiskey, so the eventual collaboration was inevitable. Faithful disciples of Rock ’n’ Roll and musician’s musicians both, Nash and Day have given a big stage to their talents and drives with this debut EP, so pour a good glass, give a nod to your betters, and meet The Contenders.
Garrison Starr
Garrison Starr
Garrison Starr is a singer, songwriter and record producer based in Los Angeles. Her latest musical release, "What If There Is No Destination" was released June 2017. Starr has released 15 albums as a solo artist.

Known for her vibrant and impassioned live performances, Starr’s shows have been described as “marrying pop smarts and Americana grit with a voice of remarkable power and clarity”(gomemphis.com 2012).

Starr is a full time songwriter in Los Angeles whose songs have been featured on numerous TV shows and commercials. She regularly collaborates with various artists on projects and has found great success writing for TV and film.

In 2016, Starr collaborated with long time friend, Margaret Cho, and produced “American Myth.” Starr also co-wrote, played guitar and sang on the record. The album was nominated for a Grammy in the Comedy category.

Garrison's love for truth-telling, good whiskey and human connection has made her a darling of the singer-songwriter world.
christian lopez
christian lopez
For singer, songwriter and guitarist Christian Lopez, Nashville has become a home away from home. That’s where he comes to write. He rehearses there with his band. His debut album and Red Arrow, his brand new follow-up for Blaster Records, were recorded in Music City too.

But his heart? His long-term dream? Well, they’re rooted someplace far away from Music Row, to the place where he was born and knows he will never leave.

“I’ve dedicated 100% of my life and time to my music. I work on some aspect of it every day. But I also see myself back in West Virginia someday, with a house and a big yard where I can relax. And a dog too,” he adds quickly, with a laugh. “You could say that’s the American Dream. For me, it’s more specifically my West Virginian dream.”

Handsome, thoughtful and well spoken, Lopez is less concerned with the rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle than with spending time back home with friends, family and the old cars he and his dad like to tinker with. At the same time, as interest in his multiple talents heats up, this only feeds into his fascination with discovering places, ideas and music. Lopez has been stoking that fire for five years, since he began touring and learning how to turn a bunch of bar patrons into foot-stomping, cheering fans.

By that time, Lopez had already laid the foundation of a distinctive sound and style. Drawn first to the power of classic rock ’n’ roll, Lopez enriched and expanded on this foundation at age 15. “That’s when my dad brought me those The Essential compilation albums from Willie, Waylon, Johnny and Kris,” he remembers. “It was then that I started to realize that meaning and message could matter in music.”

So he started to write. He widened his listening, going deep into and beyond traditional country toward what wasn’t yet labeled as Americana. When inspiration struck, he responded with a song. Soon inspiration became a frequent caller. Originals nudged covers out of the way on his set lists. His love for music transformed into certainty that performing his own songs was what he had been born to do.

Eventually Lopez connected with Grammy-winning producer Dave Cobb in Nashville. Their creative synergy ignited on Lopez’s first album, Onward, released in 2015. “Working with Dave taught me to trust my first instincts and not to overthink my ideas because the magic usually comes naturally,” he says. “I’ll remember that forever.”

Two years later, with characteristic curiosity, Lopez decided to explore different paths for his sophomore project. Over nine months, he tempered the intuitive approach he had cultivated for Onward with a more measured process, beginning with the careful selection of producer Marshall Altman. “It was almost like a science experiment,” he says, with a laugh. “But that’s what I thought recording would be like when I was a kid — a work of art rather than just throwing together a bunch of songs.”

The songs, too, were different. His recent works reflected a more perceptive view of the world as well as a greater self-awareness. Some of this came from co-writing, which he’d never done before. “It did help me expand my thought process and come up with ideas I never would have on my own.”

All of which makes Red Arrow a milestone for this emerging artist. On “Don’t Wanna Say Goodnight,” Lopez kicks into high gear, riding by the rockabilly rhythm as if hearing it for the first time. A different innocence informs “Swim The River,” through lyrics that conjure the thrill of young love. On the other hand, “1972” is a disarmingly affectionate tribute to his International Harvester Scout — and the romantic adventures it has witnessed. Writing with Mindy Smith and Josh Williams, Lopez came up with “Still On Its Feet,” an eloquent analogy equating beloved old piece of furniture with one who has weathered hard times; Vince Gill’s guitar accompanies Lopez’s intimate vocal. And for more classic harmony singing, look no further than “Caramel,” where Lopez and Kenneth Pattengale of Milk Carton Kids blend their voices and acoustic guitars with a synchronicity the Everly Brothers might have admired.

There’s much more as well, but pay special attention to “Steel On The Water.” Lopez wrote this one alone, on his last night aboard the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis en route from Pearl Harbor to San Diego. Brought onboard to entertain 5,000 sailors on their way home, he ended up at least as moved by their stories as they were by his music.

“This is maybe the most personal song I’ve written yet,” Lopez says. “When you come from the outside and join a bunch of people who’ve been living on that ship for years at a time, they gravitate toward you. They want to talk with you. They tell you everything. You’re almost like a refuge to them. It’s overwhelming, especially coming from kids your age.”

Lopez was struck especially with the parallel he sensed between their lives and his as he embarks ever further and for longer hauls away from his West Virginia home. But he understood the differences in their missions too. “The first lines talk about how ‘some go for school; some go for tradition and some go for a last resort.’ I had conversations with people on that ship who had done those things. I was so emotional when it was time to leave them.”


On these songs and the album’s six other offerings, Red Arrow does us a service. For many, it will introduce an artist whose singing radiates youthful infatuation with life through songs rooted in a reverence for American tradition. To those who have already had the pleasure of discovering him, it documents the next stage of a journey toward wisdom, insight, perhaps heartbreak and a fruitful crop of great new songs to come. For Lopez, maybe it’s a ticket on that trip that will lead to faraway places yet end back home in West Virginia. Through his music we travel with him, beginning here.
Tony Lucca
Tony Lucca
It is nearly impossible to find a current singer/songwriter between the ages of 20 and 40 who doesn’t have a seemingly identical list of influences as their peers. Whether its the soul-bearing lyrics of Stevie Wonder, or the gritty folk music of Bob Dylan, the unbridled creativity of Dave Matthews, or the overwhelming truth of Ray LaMontange, somehow these artists all seem to inform the landscape of the modern singer/songwriter. What tends to separate an artist from that pack is experience, confidence and self-exploration. 8 full-length albums into his career, Tony Lucca has become a standard-bearer to some, a torch-bearer to others, and all the while Lucca’s confidence is matched only by his humble appreciation for his path in the wild world of entertainment.

There have been quite a few milestones along the way for Lucca, and it all began for him as a Mousketeer on the Mickey Mouse Club. Lucca’s rise to fame also included a brief stint on an Aaron Spelling prime time drama coupled with a rather public relationship with actress Keri Russell. Fast forward a few years and find Lucca working with fellow former Mouse Club co-star Justin Timberlake, starring in a commercial directed by Timberlake for his own 901 Tequila. Lucca then played himself in an episode of NBC’s hit show “Parenthood”. In 2012, Lucca returned to Hollywood, this time as a finalist on Team Adam (Levine) of the hit show The Voice on NBC. All the while honing a craft that somehow managed to remain the primary focus of his heart, soul and passion – songwriting.

A master of observation, Lucca seems to have stored away every last experience and anecdote as a stepping off point, a palette and canvas with which to turn his impressions of life and relationships into beautiful, thoughtful and often emotionally painful songs that tend to find their way deep into the cracks and crevices of his listeners’ hearts. With almost 20 years of industry experience, Lucca has taken great pride in maintaining a thorough connection with his fans at his dynamic live shows, and by always attempting to stay out in front of the endless barrage of changes, the ups and downs that have left so many in the music business in their own wake. Lucca had the foresight to establish www.tonylucca.com long before the proliferation of social media, yet he has also successfully embraced the ever-changing tech landscape, garnering over half a million followers on twitter (@luccadoes). Lucca truly has embodied the notion that independent doesn’t mean alone: he remains dedicated, determined and nothing if not eternally grateful for what has been an unimaginable ride, with an entirely original soundtrack.
Jay Nash
Jay Nash
The legend Levon Helm said that if you give it good concentration, good energy, good heart, and good performance, the song will play you. If that's true, then Jay Nash and Josh Day are well and truly played by the set of songs in their debut EP, "Meet The Contenders." The collection breathes with musicality and grit in the tradition of heroes—The Band, Tom Petty, The Dead, Dylan. Thrumming and heady, with a steady heartbeat and a hint of honky-tonk, this EP speaks of wanderers and highways, lovers and losers, good times and missed chances, swimming pools and movie stars, all with a ferocity born of hard work and honed skill. Nash and Day have been players and poets for the better part of two decades; they have been making music, telling tales, drinking whiskey, and having fun touring together as The Contenders since 2012.

Jay Nash's music is like the river that raised him—strong and deep, with a little bit of lullaby and a big damn current. Twenty years ago, he played loud in bars along the Saint Lawrence River, in the reaches of New York so far-flung they're almost Canadian. For the last decade, he's journeyed the US and Europe solo, selling over 60,000 records without ever putting ink on a conventional record deal. Now in the green mountains, the quiet cold of winter rarefies wit and musicianship into the kind of Americana that knows where it comes from.

Hailing from the sweet, sticky hill country of North Carolina, Josh Day brings a percussive virtuosity that shapes the music and supports the vocals. With shining creativity and fine-boned craftsmanship, Day has that special something that resonates with audiences and always feels like a party. Be it playing bluegrass with the Kruger Brothers, touring with Sara Bareilles, or drumming for Jennifer Nettles, Day keeps it busy and honest, just what one would expect from a man who plays with so much heart.

Lady luck introduced Nash and Day at Room 5 in Los Angeles over a decade ago. They both loved The Band and whiskey, so the eventual collaboration was inevitable. Faithful disciples of Rock 'n' Roll and musician's musicians both, Nash and Day have given a big stage to their talents and drives with this debut EP, so pour a good glass, give a nod to your betters, and meet The Contenders.
Matt Duke
Matt Duke
As heard on XM Satellite Radio's "The Loft" and "Coffeehouse", Matt Duke is an American singer-songwriter born in Reston, Virginia but raised in Mount Laurel Township, New Jersey. He released his first independent album, Winter Child in 2003 co-produced by Stewart Lerman (Loudon Wainwright, Dar Williams) and Steuart Smith (The Eagles, Shawn Colvin) at The Shinebox Studios in New York City. Later he signed to a major label and has since released multiple albums: Kingdom Underground and One Day Die, plus two more EPs.

Duke began playing piano at the age of seven, and by ten he developed a deep love for the arts. Inspired by artists such as Van Morrison, The Band, and Pearl Jam, he taught himself how to play his mother's vintage guitar. Duke spent his high school years at Philadelphia's St. Joseph's Prep, where he was exposed to Ani DiFranco, Ben Harper, Tool, and Damien Rice. Impressed by their poignant lyrics and musical ambition, Duke started writing and performing at coffee houses in Philadelphia area. He tours primarily as a solo act, with just an acoustic guitar but is also a member of the acoustic guitar trio T.F.D.I. with Jay Nash and Tony Lucca.
Keaton Simons
Keaton Simons
Keaton Simons is truly what the Los Angeles Times terms "a triple threat." He captivates audiences with an authentic voice, compelling and soul-baring songs, and a true command of both acoustic and electric guitars in every genre. The energy and passion that Keaton brings to his work (whether in the studio or performing live) are as infectious and stirring as his lyrics and melodies.
As 2013 commences, Keaton Simons is gearing up for the release of his sophomore full-length album Beautiful Pain, co-produced with Mikal Blue (Colbie Caillat, One Republic) and mastered by Gavin Lurssen of Lurssen Mastering. Beautiful Pain also includes co-writes with friends and peers Jason Mraz, Jason Reeves, Glen Phillips (Toad The Wet Sprocket) and Mikal Blue among others. The highly-anticipated album will be released in the Spring on Keaton's newly formed label, Best Revenge Records. The label's marketing efforts will be headed up by Croshal Entertainment Group, who have assisted a number of prominent independent releases including those by Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne, Collective Soul, Elliot Yamin and Gnarls Barkley amongst many others.
A regular in The Hotel Café singer/songwriter circuit, Keaton Simons has been recognized by Examiner.com as achieving "cult-like" status in his hometown of Los Angeles, CA. But as most know, Keaton is far from being just an "L.A. guy" let alone a "new artist" on the mainstream map. His debut EP Currently was released on Maverick Records in 2004 and his debut full-length album Can You Hear Me was released on CBS Records in 2008. Since then, he has toured nationally and internationally, opening for Coldplay, Train, Guster and REO Speedwagon amongst others. He has also worked as a writer, musical director, singer, bassist and guitarist with such notable acts as Gnarls Barkley, Snoop Dogg, Josh Kelley and Tre Hardson (The Pharcyde.)
In addition, Keaton's music has been heard in dozens of feature films and television shows, including Sons of Anarchy, Private Practice, NCIS, Malcolm in the Middle, Numb3rs and Hollywood Heights. He has also performed on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson and Last Call with Carson Daly. In 2011 Keaton appeared on VH1's Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew alongside stepfather, actor Eric Roberts, who was a patient. Keaton recently appeared acting in the David Duchovny Showtime hit, Californication. A performance of his song
"Unstoppable" on the show resulted in over 10,000 iTunes downloads in only two days.
"After bouncing between major label contracts and promises of new deals, I'm following my instincts, assembling my dream team, and hitting the launch button on the type of album I've been wanting to put out for years," says Keaton Simons. "Beautiful Pain shows who I am as an artist, a songwriter, a musician and a producer." Beautiful Pain is Keaton's most universal release to date, and maintains his high caliber of songwriting, production and musicianship. With the exception of the drums, which are played by the United Nations' Musical Director, Robin DiMaggio (Paul Simon, David Bowie, Lopez Tonight), all instruments on Beautiful Pain are played by Keaton. Additional featured artists on the record include Alex Al (bass), Lenny Castro (percussion), Zac Rae (keys), Tyler Hilton (piano, vocals), and Tower of Power's Bill Churchville (trumpet, trombone) and Sean Hill (saxophone).
Keaton Simons and Best Revenge Records have a big year planned for 2013, beginning with the release of "Beautiful Pain," the first single and title track of the new record. Fans can also expect to see Keaton back on tour throughout the US, performing both solo acoustic and with his full band at a venue near you.
Venue Information:
Evanston SPACE
1245 Chicago Ave
Evanston, IL, 60202
http://evanstonspace.com/